News & Press Releases

 

Global Recognition for Stanford Freshwater Solution

Lotus Water Project wins Wash Alliance Prize at World Water Week in Stockholm

Published: Friday, September 12, 2014 Source: Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment
Why A Toilet Alone Won't Do The Job: The 'Software' Of Sanitation Innovation

A range of container-based sanitation offerings are becoming available worldwide, including the re.source solution through Stanford's Water, Health and Development program. The services rely on simple, affordable technologies that fit in with slum lifestyle challenges.

Published: Thursday, July 31, 2014 Source: Forbes
Neighborly Transaction As Health Solution

Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment showcases Stanford Environmental Engineering researchers examining informal water practice in Mozambique.

Published: Friday, December 6, 2013 Source: Woods Institute for the Environment
Priming the Pumps - Debugging Dhaka's Water

This article presented by Stanford Medicine follows the journey of Stanford Environmental Engineers and Professors of Medicine through the slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh in their efforts to provide clean water to those most desperately in need. Amy Pickering, PhD, stood at the edge of the river, the water blackened by waste and debris, as the ferryman beckoned to her from his fragile wooden skiff, the only means to the other side. It was February 2011, the start of Pickering’s first visit to Dhaka, Bangladesh, and she was getting her first good look at the challenge ahead: Flimsy pipes sucked in foul river water, which would be dispensed through communal pumps for slum dwellers to drink...

Published: Wednesday, July 10, 2013 Source: Stanford Medicine - Ruthann Richter
Virginia Tech researchers find link between diarrhea incidence and more prolonged droughts in Africa

The World Health Organization reported that close to 920,000 people in the U.N. agency's Africa region died of diarrheal diseases in 2008. Nearly three-quarters of these deaths were children younger than 4, and this region accounts for 40 percent of global deaths from diarrhea in young children. Researchers at Virginia Tech have found that climate change could make this problem even worse. A study published last week in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health by Alexander et al. reveals a direct link between the hotter, drier conditions associated with climate change and an increased incidence of diarrheal diseases in Botswana.

Using health data from Botswana spanning a 30-year period (1974–2003), researchers at Virginia Tech evaluated monthly reports of diarrheal disease among patients presenting to Botswana...

Published: Tuesday, April 2, 2013 Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Improving Access to Clean Drinking Water

Stanford researchers working on low-cost technology to provide safe drinking water to millions received prestigious federal recognition recently. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)...

Published: Tuesday, December 4, 2012 Source: Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment
Children, Sanitation, and Health

Each year, diarrhea kills an estimated 1.8 million people worldwide. More than 90 percent of the victims are children younger than 5. In 2006, Stanford researchers Jenna Davis, Ali Boehm, and Gary...

Published: Friday, April 3, 2009 Source: Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment

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